The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black: Book review

The Darkest Part of the Forest
Publisher/Year: February 5th 2015 Indigo
Genre: YA Fantasy
Series: No
Pages: 328
Source/Format: Hardback | Bought
Rating: 4 stars out of 5

*This review may contain spoilers!*

Synopsis

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the centre of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

My review

This is my first book by Holly where she isn't writing with someone else, and hopefully it won't be my last. I had heard a lot of mixed reviews about this book before I bought and read it, but I decided to give it a go anyway and I'm glad I did.

Reading about the town of Fairfold made me want so much for it to be real, because if it was I would definitely visit it. It just sounds so unique and I loved the mix of modern and unreal, the juxtaposition of the two. Some of the places where Hazel and Ben and Jack hung out, like the forest and the vintage shop/cafe seemed like my kind of places.

One thing I loved about this book is that one of the main characters is young, gay and out and yet that is not used as a plot point, or a way to make the story unique. He is regarded in the complete same way as everyone else, and even though that should be the norm already, I'm glad we are at least making some progress towards it becoming that way.

I haven't read that many fairy books, and I wasn't too sure if it was my thing, but if they're all as good as this one was, then I can see myself reading more.

Severin really brought the mystery to this book, and Holly's magnificent writing only helped to make him even more intriguing.

I can undoubtedly see myself reading this beaut of a book again, and I hope you do too.

Izzy

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